Apr
11
to Apr 13

Teaching: Catapult Writing, How To Build a Short Story (8 Weeks)

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How to Build a Short Story

Do you often think you have great ideas for a short story but aren’t sure how to get those ideas from your head to the page? This 8-week session will consist of reading and discussing short stories, completing writing exercises both in and out of the classroom, and receiving thoughtful, constructive feedback from your instructor and peers. Through the careful exploration of the elements of fiction (characterization, world-building, backstory, structure, and so on), participants will learn what makes a good story idea and how to develop that idea into a full story. At the end of the session, students will have the tools to draft an entire short story, as well as multiple story starts to follow up on. This class is suitable for all levels of writers, from the beginning writer to the more experienced writer who wants fresh ideas for works in progress or to generate new work.

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Reading at Word Up Books with Phillip Lopate
Mar
26
3:00 PM15:00

Reading at Word Up Books with Phillip Lopate

  • Word Up Community Bookshop/Libreria Comunitaria (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

A reading of recent work from current and former Washington Heights residents and writers Danielle Lazarin and Phillip Lopate.

DANIELLE LAZARIN'S debut short story collection, BACK TALK, is forthcoming from Penguin Books in 2018. Her fiction has appeared in Colorado Review, Indiana Review, Glimmer Train, Boston Review, and elsewhere. She's a 2015 NYFA fellow in fiction and the recipient of multiple individual artists grants from NoMAA. She lives in her native New York, where she is at work on a novel.

PHILLIP LOPATE has written three personal essay collections; two novels, three poetry collections; and more works of criticism. Recent publications include Portrait Inside My Head (personal essays), To Show and to Tell: the Craft of Literary Nonfiction, and A Mother’s Tale (2017). He has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, a NYPL Center for Scholars and Writers Fellowship, two NEA grants, and two NYFA grants. After working with children for twelve years as a writer in schools, he taught creative writing and literature at Fordham, Cooper Union, University of Houston, Hofstra University, New York University and Bennington College. He is the director of the nonfiction graduate program at Columbia University, where he also teaches writing.

RSVP here.

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